The Director's Chair
Directors ChairThe Director's Chair is a compilation of interviews from a variety of sources with many of our leading Directors of both the past and present. In these interviews lie "Golden Nuggets" of information from which everyone working in the Motion Picture and Television Industry can learn!

Where applicable, each article offers a link to Shop Amazon where you may obtain additional materials on the subject.
The Director's Chair interviews were provided by Roger DeForest.

There are 51 Videos in this collection
Director / Screenwriter, Allison Anders

Allison Anders Interview

Q: What is Four Rooms about?

quote-leftIt's four friends telling four stories in one movie, but it's different from other anthology films because it has a connecting character who develops throughout the film. That's Ted the Bellboy, played by Tim Roth. It's New Year's Eve: he goes into these four rooms, and each room is directed by a different person: me, Alexander Rockwell, Robert Rodriguez, or Quentin Tarantino. And terrible things happen to him. Actually he makes out best in my room because he gets laid by Ione Skye!

Wed, 02/22/2017 - 05:00
0 comments
John Carpenter | Director

John Carpenter talks about "Escape from LA"

How does it feel crawling back into the world of Snake Plissken?

quote-leftThe weekend before we started principal photography, I was sitting around my house, brooding. My wife and my son said, "What's wrong with you?" I said, "I'm worried that I don't know the style." The original "Escape from New York" was written in 1974 and wasn't made until 1981. That was a young man's idea, it was a vision of somebody who saw things differently. Now, I'm an old veteran. Am I going to be able to get back in the saddle again?

Sat, 05/13/2017 - 11:31
0 comments
Director, Michelangelo Antonioni

Michelangelo Antonioni (On Directing)

I am not a theoretician of the cinema. If you ask me what directing is, the first answer that comes into my head is: I don't know. The second: All my opinions on the subject are in my films. Among other things, I am an opponent of any separation of the various phases of the work. Such separation has an exclusively practical value. It is valuable for all those who participate in the work - except for the director, if he happens to be both author and director at once. To speak of directing as one of the phases in this work is to engage in a theoretical discussion which seems to me opposed to that unity of the whole to which every artist is committed during his work.

Mon, 01/22/2018 - 16:29
0 comments
Atom Egoyan, Director

Atom Egoyan: A Quick Chat

This is the second novel you've adapted. What brought you back to that genre?

quote-leftA great novelist presents a gallery of characters and situations and places with such an extraordinary sense of detail that, if you feel that it is something that you could interpret and give cinematic life to, it's difficult to resist the gift that's been given to you. It's that balance of trying to respect and honour the spirit of their work, but also feeling free to reinvent and to find a way of reinterpreting it, which makes the process of adaptation organic and urgent. I think a film adaptation needs to have a sense of urgency: there's nothing more boring to me than illustrating a book. With Exotica that I'd gone as far as I could with a certain set of obsessions and concerns, and that film seemed to be the summation of a certain type of film that I was making up to that point.

Tue, 02/20/2018 - 11:30
0 comments