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Read this important information FIRST!

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Anecdotes from the Industry's Past!
Angie Dickenson, Howard Hawks on set "Rio Bravo"

Please use this forum to view and post anecdotes and stories from the Motion Picture and Television Industry's past!

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Screenwriter

The exchange:

YOUR MASTERPIECE
ACT ONE
     FADE IN:

1  INT - COMPUTER - SCREENWRITERS' EXCHANGE - - Day 1
We open on a computer screen. Reflected in the glass we see the face of an intense individual. As the camera pans around it reveals that YOU are engaged in surfing the internet and come across 
IndustryCentral - The Motion Picture and Television Industry Professional's First Stop! 
As you click through the pages, you locate the ScreenWriters' Exchange.

YOU
(amazed)
Wow! This is what I have been looking for.
The mood intensifies
YOU
(continuing)
Now I know where to start to have my story become a reality!
(CONTINUED)

 

The Rules:

Reading Submissions

Anyone with WWW access can read submissions on this exchange. To read submissions, navigate to the submission of interest by single clicking on the links from the list of topics and subtopics. You can navigate backwards using the navigation bars at the top of each page. Adding your Storyline/Synopsis

If you would like to submit the Storyline/Synopsis of a screenplay that you either are working on, have completed, or simply an idea for one that you wish to develop and would like to "Pitch" in the IndustryCentral ScreenWriters' Exchange, you are welcome to do so. The first step is to register as a user on this site by clicking on any "Login/Register" link and following the instructions. Please note that not everyone is approved and in theory should have some involvement or association with the Motion Picture & Television Industry. Once you have completed this process, simply navigate to the Genre' that is appropriate and click on the "Submit a Synopis" button.

Your submission will be reviewed by one of our Expert Moderators who may chose to offer a brief analysis of your submission. This process may take a day or two to complete as our moderators are busy working professionals who have agreed to volunteer their time.

In the spirit of cooperative feedback, your submission then becomes part of an open forum where others may add comments. Hopefully within these comments you may find a new twist or idea that might just make your screenplay get that all important option that is the first step in reaching the big or small screen!

Contributing to Submissions

Authenticated (logged in) readers are encouraged to offer constructive feedback on any of the storyline/synopsis' already submitted to the exchange in order to assist the Writer in developing his or her script. In order to contribute feedback or post a new storyline/synopsis of your own you must first complete the registration process by getting an account. To offer feedback to an existing submission, fill in the "Add a Message" box at the bottom of the page. You may use formatting (source) codes or basic HTML tags to improve the appearance of your post via our basic HTML WYSIWYG Editor. At the discretion of the moderators, the discussion may allow public posting or may require a user account (username and password). Follow the instructions on the form to supply the necessary credentials for posting.

Where available, you may click on a "Submit a Synopsis" button to start a new discussion. This will add a subtopic with the subject you specify and start a conversation with the initial message that you specify. After filling in the subject line, post a message as described above.

Rules and "Netiquette"

When writing your messages, please use the same courtesy that you would show when speaking face-to-face with someone. Flames, insults, and personal attacks will not be tolerated. It's fine to disagree strongly with opinions, ideas, and facts, but always with respect for the other person. Great minds do not always think alike, and that's where the fun is! Also, note that messages express the thoughts of the writers, not the exchange or its moderators.

 

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Action/Adventure

Action/Adventure

Action film is a genre in which the protagonist or protagonists end up in a series of challenges that typically include violence, extended fighting, physical feats, and frantic chases. Action films tend to feature a resourceful hero struggling against incredible odds, which include life-threatening situations, a villain, or a pursuit which generally concludes in victory for the hero (though a small number of films in this genre have ended in victory for the villain instead). Advancements in CGI have made it cheaper and easier to create action sequences and other visual effects that required the efforts of professional stunt crews in the past. However, reactions to action films containing significant amounts of CGI have been mixed as films that use computer animations to create unrealistic, highly unbelievable events are often met with criticism.[1] While action has long been a recurring component in films, the "action film" genre began to develop in the 1970s along with the increase of stunts and special effects. Common action scenes in films are generally, but not limited to, car chases, fighting and gunplay or shootouts.

This genre is closely associated with the thriller and adventure genres, and they may also contain elements of spy fiction.

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Drama

Drama

When used to define a specific genre or type of film or television programme, drama is usually qualified with additional terms that specify its particular subgenre, such as "political drama", "courtroom drama", "historical drama", "domestic drama", or "comedy-drama". These terms tend to indicate a particular setting or subject-matter, or else they qualify the otherwise serious tone of a drama with elements that encourage a broader range of moods. All forms of cinema or television that involve fictional stories are forms of drama in the broader sense if their storytelling is achieved by means of actors who represent (mimesis) characters. In this broader sense, drama is a mode distinct from novels, short stories, and narrative poetry or songs.[1] In the modern era before the birth of cinema or television, "drama" came to be used within the theatre as a generic term to describe a type of play that was neither a comedy nor a tragedy. It is this narrower sense that the film and television industries, along with film studies, adopted. "Radio drama" has been used in both senses—originally transmitted in a live performance, it has also been used to describe the more high-brow and serious end of the dramatic output of radio.

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Horror/Thriller

Horror/Thriller

A horror film is a movie that seeks to elicit a physiological reaction, such as an elevated heartbeat, through the use of fear and shocking one’s audiences. Initially often inspired by literature from authors like Edgar Allan Poe, Bram Stoker and Mary Shelley, horror has existed as a film genre for more than a century. The macabre and the supernatural are frequent themes. Horror may also overlap with the fantasy, supernatural fiction and thriller genres.

Horror films often aim to evoke viewers' nightmares, fears, revulsions and terror of the unknown. Plots within the horror genre often involve the intrusion of an evil force, event, or personage into the everyday world. Prevalent elements include ghosts, aliens, vampires, werewolves, demons, satanism, gore, torture, vicious animals, evil witches, monsters, zombies, cannibals, psychopaths, natural or man-made disasters, and serial killers. Some subgenres of horror film include action horror, comedy horror, body horror, disaster horror, holiday horror, horror drama, psychological horror, science fiction horror, slasher horror, supernatural horror, gothic horror, natural horror, zombie horror, first-person horror and teen horror.

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Comedy

Comedy

Comedy is a genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humor. These films are designed to make the audience laugh through amusement and most often work by exaggerating characteristics for humorous effect. Films in this style traditionally have a happy ending (black comedy being an exception). One of the oldest genres in film, some of the very first silent movies were comedies, as slapstick comedy often relies on visual depictions, without requiring sound. When sound films became more prevalent during the 1920s, comedy films took another swing, as laughter could result from burlesque situations but also dialogue. Comedy, compared with other film genres, puts much more focus on individual stars, with many former stand-up comics transitioning to the film industry due to their popularity. While many comic films are lighthearted stories with no intent other than to amuse, others contain political or social commentary (such as The King of Comedy and Wag the Dog).

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Science Fiction

SciFi

Science fiction film (or sci-fi) is a genre that uses speculative, fictional science-based depictions of phenomena that are not fully accepted by mainstream science, such as extraterrestrial lifeforms, alien worlds, extrasensory perception and time travel, along with futuristic elements such as spacecraft, robots, cyborgs, interstellar travel or other technologies. Science fiction films have often been used to focus on political or social issues, and to explore philosophical issues like the human condition. In many cases, tropes derived from written science fiction may be used by filmmakers ignorant of or at best indifferent to the standards of scientific plausibility and plot logic to which written science fiction is traditionally held.

The genre has existed since the early years of silent cinema, when Georges Melies' A Trip to the Moon (1902) employed trick photography effects. The next major example in the genre was the film Metropolis (1927) - being the first feature length science fiction movie. From the 1930s to the 1950s, the genre consisted mainly of low-budget B movies. After Stanley Kubrick's landmark 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), the science fiction film genre was taken more seriously. In the late 1970s, big-budget science fiction films filled with special effects became popular with audiences after the success of Star Wars and paved the way for the blockbuster hits of subsequent decades.

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Western

Western

The Western is a genre of various arts which tell stories set primarily in the later half of the 19th century in the American Old West, often centering on the life of a nomadic cowboy or gunfighter[1] armed with a revolver and a rifle who rides a horse. Cowboys and gunslingers typically wear Stetson hats, bandannas, spurs, cowboy boots and buckskins. Other characters include Native Americans, bandits, lawmen, bounty hunters, outlaws, soldiers (especially mounted cavalry), settlers, both farmers and ranchers, and townsfolk.

Westerns often stress the harshness of the wilderness and frequently set the action in an arid, desolate landscape of deserts and mountains. Often, the vast landscape plays an important role, presenting a "...mythic vision of the plains and deserts of the American West". Specific settings include ranches, small frontier towns, saloons, railways and isolated military forts of the Wild West. Common plots include the construction of a railroad or a telegraph line on the wild frontier; ranchers protecting their family ranch from rustlers or large landowners or who build a ranch empire; revenge stories, which hinge on the chase and pursuit by someone who has been wronged; stories about cavalry fighting Indians; outlaw gang plots; and stories about a lawman or bounty hunter tracking down his quarry. Many Westerns use a stock plot of depicting a crime, then showing the pursuit of the wrongdoer, ending in revenge and retribution, which is often dispensed through a shootout or quick draw duel

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Situation Comedy (Sitcom)

Sitcom

A sit-com or sitcom, a portmanteau of the full term "situation comedy", is a genre of comedy centered on a fixed set of characters who carry over from episode to episode. Sitcoms can be contrasted with sketch comedy, where a troupe may use new characters in each sketch, and stand-up comedy, where a comedian tells jokes and stories to an audience. Sitcoms originated in radio, but today are found mostly on television as one of its dominant narrative forms. This form can also include mockumentaries.

A situation comedy television program may be recorded in front of a studio audience, depending on the program's production format. The effect of a live studio audience can be imitated or enhanced by the use of a laugh track. During filming productions, the laugh track is usually prerecorded.

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Documentary

Documentary

A documentary film is a nonfictional motion picture intended to document some aspect of reality, primarily for the purposes of instruction, education, or maintaining a historical record.[1] Such films were originally shot on film stock—the only medium available—but now include video and digital productions that can be either direct-to-video, made into a TV show, or released for screening in cinemas. "Documentary" has been described as a "filmmaking practice, a cinematic tradition, and mode of audience reception" that is continually evolving and is without clear boundaries.

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Opportunities for Screenwriters

Opportunities for Screenwriters

  • Grants
  • Competitions
  • Spec Opportunities
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