The Director's Chair
Directors ChairThe Director's Chair is a compilation of interviews from a variety of sources with many of our leading Directors of both the past and present. In these interviews lie "Golden Nuggets" of information from which everyone working in the Motion Picture and Television Industry can learn!

Where applicable, each article offers a link to Shop Amazon where you may obtain additional materials on the subject.
The Director's Chair interviews were provided by Roger DeForest.

There are 50 Videos in this collection
Alfred Hitchcock | Director

Peter Bogdanovich interviews Alfred Hitchcock, 1963

You never watch your films with an audience. Don't you miss hearing them scream?

quote-leftNo. I can hear them when I'm making the picture.

Do you feel that the American film remains the most vital cinema?

quote-leftWorldwide, yes. Because when we make films for the United States, we are automatically making them for all the world--because America is full of foreigners. It's a melting pot. Which brings us to another point. I don't know what they mean when they talk about "Hollywood" pictures. I say, "Where are they conceived?" Look at this room--you can't see out the windows. We might just as well be in a hotel room in London, or anywhere you like. So here is where we get it down on paper. Now where do we go? We go on location, perhaps; and then where do we work? We're inside on a stage, the big doors are closed, and we're down in a coal mine: we don't know what the weather is like outside. Again we don't know where we are--only within our film, within the thing we're making. That's why it's such nonsense to talk about locale. "Hollywood." That doesn't mean anything to me. If you say, "Why do you like working in Hollywood?" I would say, because I can get home at six o'clock for dinner.

Sun, 06/21/2020 - 19:07
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Francis Ford Coppola | Director, Producer, Screenwriter, Composer

Francis Ford Coppola - Up to "The Cotton Club"

You served your apprenticeship originally with Roger Corman working on horror movies. Was that a good apprenticeship?

quote-leftOh yeah. Aside from the fact that it was the only apprenticeship possible, the only way to gain that experience. Nowadays there are many people like Roger making so-called exploitation films. But in those days there was nothing other than Roger, and I was lucky to become his personal assistant, and he assigned me many many different jobs, from editing and writing to being a sound recordist, cameraman - you name it, I did it for him. And although the pay was, of course, very very poor, what you gained in experience and confidence more than made up for it.

Wed, 06/19/2019 - 13:30
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Jonathan Demme, Director

Jonathan Demme: 1998 Interview

In a few minutes I'll ask you about Beloved, and about Storefront Hitchcock, but before I do I'd just like to do a little canter over some other parts of your career. I know you've talked a lot about your time in the Corman stable in the 1970s and your development through the work you did there and the movies you made with Roger Corman. I wanted to ask you about what the single most important thing was that you learnt from Roger Corman in terms of that background that really gave you the opportunity to become a director?

quote-leftI think it was probably that it was completely understood that if you didn't complete the days work on any given day that you would be replaced. That instilled in me a very strong discipline and a sense that first and foremost your priority was to keep the movie on schedule and on budget, and that's one way you get to stay on the job. That was very valuable. Roger also said something I'll never forget. He said that as far as he was concerned the formula for a director was 40 per cent artist, 60 per cent businessman. He also had a little pat speech that he'd give you before you did your first directing job, a lot of really good rules - stuff that most movie goers know anyway - just ways to keep the eye entertained, the value of well-motivated camera movement... that kind of thing. He was great. We called it the Roger Corman school of film technique. You really did learn on the job.

Wed, 05/01/2019 - 09:26
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