The Director's Chair
Directors ChairThe Director's Chair is a compilation of interviews from a variety of sources with many of our leading Directors of both the past and present. In these interviews lie "Golden Nuggets" of information from which everyone working in the Motion Picture and Television Industry can learn!

Where applicable, each article offers a link to Shop Amazon where you may obtain additional materials on the subject.
The Director's Chair interviews were provided by Roger DeForest.

There are 50 Videos in this collection
Director / Screenwriter, Allison Anders

Allison Anders Interview

Q: What is Four Rooms about?

quote-leftIt's four friends telling four stories in one movie, but it's different from other anthology films because it has a connecting character who develops throughout the film. That's Ted the Bellboy, played by Tim Roth. It's New Year's Eve: he goes into these four rooms, and each room is directed by a different person: me, Alexander Rockwell, Robert Rodriguez, or Quentin Tarantino. And terrible things happen to him. Actually he makes out best in my room because he gets laid by Ione Skye!

Fri, 12/18/2020 - 05:00
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Cameron Crowe on "Charlie Rose"

Cameron Crowe - Following Jerry McGuire

How would this film have been different if it was an independent film? Would it have been made?

quote-leftYeah, definitely. Probably we'd have the same cast, with a different guy playing Jerry Maguire, unless we were able to make an amazing deal with Tom Cruise to do that kind of a movie--which he might have done, I guess. But most of the people, I think, would have been there anyway--it's not a real typical Hollywood cast, hopefully.

Tue, 12/15/2020 - 09:26
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Alfred Hitchcock | Director

Peter Bogdanovich interviews Alfred Hitchcock, 1963

You never watch your films with an audience. Don't you miss hearing them scream?

quote-leftNo. I can hear them when I'm making the picture.

Do you feel that the American film remains the most vital cinema?

quote-leftWorldwide, yes. Because when we make films for the United States, we are automatically making them for all the world--because America is full of foreigners. It's a melting pot. Which brings us to another point. I don't know what they mean when they talk about "Hollywood" pictures. I say, "Where are they conceived?" Look at this room--you can't see out the windows. We might just as well be in a hotel room in London, or anywhere you like. So here is where we get it down on paper. Now where do we go? We go on location, perhaps; and then where do we work? We're inside on a stage, the big doors are closed, and we're down in a coal mine: we don't know what the weather is like outside. Again we don't know where we are--only within our film, within the thing we're making. That's why it's such nonsense to talk about locale. "Hollywood." That doesn't mean anything to me. If you say, "Why do you like working in Hollywood?" I would say, because I can get home at six o'clock for dinner.

Sun, 06/21/2020 - 19:07
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